Important Vaccinations for Adults

Despite what anti-vaxxers claim about the effects of vaccination on children, herd immunity is still the best defense against contagious disease outbreaks. Even as adults, there are vaccines that you might need to protect yourself against deadly diseases.

Influenza

One dose annually from the ages 19 to 65. This isn’t recommended if the person is allergic to eggs or has a Guillain-Barre syndrome.

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis or whooping cough (Td/Tdap)

One Tdap dose, then Td booster every 10 years between ages 19 to 65; women are also advised to get a Tdap vaccination every pregnancy. This isn’t recommended to persons who are allergic to Tdap or have seizures.

Zoster (Shingles)

individuals aged 60 to 65 or older should get one dose of Herpes zoster vaccination. This isn’t recommended for pregnant women or those allergic to antibiotic neomycin or gelatin.

Pneumococcal

The one- or two-dose vaccination for PCV13 and PPSV23 are recommended for individuals aged 65 years and above, but it may be given to people younger than 65 years if there is a risk of contracting diseases. This isn’t recommended if the person is allergic to the vaccine.

Meningococcal

The one- to three-dose vaccination for MenACWY/MPSV4 and MenB may be given to individuals aged between 19 to 65 or older if there is risk of contracting diseases

Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR)

One or two doses for ages 19 to 59 years if the individual did not get this vaccination as a child or the vaccination was not completed at 21 years for men and 26 years for women. This isn’t recommended for people who are pregnant or who have HIV/AIDS, blood disorder, cancer or who had surgery and vaccination within the last 4 weeks.

Human papillomavirus

Women can get a three-dose vaccination between ages 19 to 26, while men can get three-dose vaccination at ages 19 to 21 or until 26 years if needed. This isn’t recommended to pregnant women or to people who are allergic to the vaccine.

Varicella (Chickenpox)

The two-dose vaccination for chickenpox is given at ages 19 to 26 if the individual has not completed the vaccinations as a child or before 21 years for males and 26 years for females. This isn’t recommended for pregnant women or those who have HIV/AIDS, cancer or had blood transfusion

Hepatitis A

The two- to three-dose vaccination may be given to an individual between ages 19 to 65 if the individual has not completed the vaccinations as a child or before 21 years for males and 26 years for females. This isn’t recommended if the person is allergic to the vaccine.

Hepatitis B

The three-dose vaccination may be given to an individual between ages 19 to 65 if the individual has not completed the vaccinations as a child or before 21 years for males and 26 years for females. This isn’t recommended if the person is allergic to the vaccine.

Haemophilus influenzae type b

The one- to three-dose vaccination is given between ages 19 to 65.